What people think of internet dating

“Looking for a partner in crime,” “Are you my other half? in neuroscience yet wouldn’t even get an associate’s degree in “Writing an Online Dating Profile 101.” Many of our clients were successful, personable people (from grad students to physicists) who would make great girlfriends and boyfriends—once they had a dating profile that made them sound unique, one that couldn’t be cut and pasted into someone else’s.” and, my favorite, “I like candlelit dinners, sunsets and walks on the beach” (yes, people still say that! If you look at ten random profiles right now, I bet you’ll find the same thing—everyone’s “funny” and “laid-back” and “adventurous.” I used to have a standard, generic profile, too, with a list of adjectives and facts: fun, outgoing, great speller (looking back, not sure how that applied), and insert-a-bunch-of-other-adjectives here. First, I would spend 30-60 minutes talking to the client.The end result would be a profile that read like a good article or book jacket instead of a dating ad, and when someone reached the end of it, they’d want to read more and contact the person.

One engaging paragraph is far better than endless run-on sentences.

Meanwhile, the share of 55- to 64-year-olds who use online dating has doubled over the same time period (from 6% in 2013 to 12% in 2015).

For young adults in particular, this overall increase in online dating usage has been accompanied by a dramatic increase in the use of mobile dating apps.

The share of 18- to 24-year-olds who report having used online dating has nearly tripled in the last two years.

Today 27% of these young adults report that they have done so, up from just 10% in early 2013.